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Witness Torture - The Action at The White House April 19,2007

March through Washington to the White House
chained to the the fence.

I was very proud to be in this procession.

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An excerpt from an article in The Washington Post by David Montgomery, published a couple years ago:

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The name of Noor Muhammad has never appeared in an American criminal court. On May 27th, Tetaz will change that.

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