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Taking on Rumsfeld in Court begins


Two of The Supremes, a peace collective, united with two courageous women of Code Pink to form the Rumsfeld 4 today in D.C. Superior Court. Katie, myself, David and Mari went before two different judges for status hearings regarding the D.C. charge of Disorderly Conduct and the Federal charge of Unlawful Entry.

Regarding the Disorderly Conduct charge, David who has a pending trial in regards to the March 20th action at the Pentagon selected to sign an agreement to avoid this judge trial. He will do 40 hours of community service -- two organizations he is considering working for are TASSC and Amnesty International. Katie, myself and Mari will appear in court on this one on September 28th. The judge assigned to us will be Pamela Diaz.

Regarding the Unlawful Entry charge, all four of us need to go before the same judge we saw today for an additional status hearing to discuss the legal necessity of a trial. Unlawful entry, because of its maximum sentence requires a jury trial. This status hearing will be on the morning of July 7th. David and I are pro se with an advisor. Mari and Katie have counsel.

If you want to learn more about what's going on in detail (and already know us personally), talk to either David and I face to face. For privacy and mutual confidentiality concerns, I will not discuss internal reasoning or strategies online or via phone.

The Supremes were founded in February 2005, when three peace-loving anti-torture activists were arrested on the lower steps of the Supreme Court protesting the U.S. Government's use of torture in Afghanistan, Iraq and Guantanamo Bay. Interestingly enough, the Dorthy Day Catholic Worker newsletter slid through Rumsfeld's door slot featured an article on torture at Guantanamo Bay, along with a hand-written note from Katie.

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